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Top 10 Most Religious Countries In The World

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Top 10 Most Religious Countries In The World | Fab.ng

The top 10 most religious countries in the world are countries that have allowed religion to play a significant role in their lives. Religion shapes cultures, traditions, and even governments.

While religious observance and beliefs vary widely from one region to another, these countries let religion hold an exceptionally prominent place in the lives of the majority of their population.

As you read on, we will explore the top 10 most religious countries in the world, based on various factors like religious adherence and influence on public life.

Read below:

1. Yemen:

Yemen stands as one of the most religious countries globally, with an overwhelmingly Muslim population.

Islam is deeply ingrained in the culture and daily lives of Yemeni people, influencing everything from governance to family structures.

2. Afghanistan:

Afghanistan is another predominantly Muslim nation where religious observance plays a central role in people’s lives. The country’s religious adherence is primarily to Islam, and this is reflected in daily routines and societal norms.

3. Somalia:

Islam also holds a prominent place in Somalia, and it significantly shapes the country’s social fabric and institutions. Many aspects of life in Somalia are influenced by Islamic traditions and principles.

4. Sudan:

Sudan’s population is overwhelmingly Muslim, and this has a significant influence on the nation’s laws and governance. Religion is closely interwoven with daily life in Sudan.

5. Pakistan:

Pakistan, a predominantly Muslim country, is a place where religion is intricately linked to politics, culture, and daily activities. The country’s official name, the Islamic Republic of Pakistan, underscores the significance of religion in national identity.

6. Egypt:

Egypt has a rich history of Islamic culture and is home to one of the oldest civilizations in the world. Islam has a profound influence on various aspects of Egyptian society, including family life and public policy.

7. Guinea:

In Guinea, an overwhelmingly Muslim nation, religion plays a central role in the daily lives of the people. Islamic traditions and practices are deeply embedded in Guinean culture.

8. East Timor (Timor-Leste):

East Timor, despite being a predominantly Christian country, practices a deep and devout form of Christianity. Catholicism, in particular, has a significant influence on people’s lives in this small Southeast Asian nation.

9. Mali:

Mali, in West Africa, is known for its rich Islamic heritage and traditions. The practice of Islam is an essential part of Malian society, from religious ceremonies to everyday customs.

10. Nigeria:

Nigeria has a diverse religious landscape, with both Islam and Christianity being widely practised. The religious influence in the country extends beyond personal belief to influence public life and governance.

Indeed, religion holds an important place in the lives of people in these top 10 most religious countries. Whether through Islamic observance, Christianity, or other faiths, the spiritual values of these nations have a profound impact on their daily lives, cultural practices, and even government policies.

While religiosity can vary significantly within each country, these nations stand out for the strong influence of religion on their societies.

Also, remember that religiosity can evolve over time, and these religious countries can vary or might shift as societies change and adapt to new influences and challenges.

Check out more articles here.

ARTS & CULTURE

Ijaw Proverbs: A Window Into Tradition, Wisdom, And Culture

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Ijaw Proverbs: A Window Into Tradition, Wisdom, Culture | Fab.ng

Ijaw Proverbs are the timeless treasures of culture. They encapsulate the wisdom, beliefs, and values of a community. Among the Ijaw people of the Niger Delta region, proverbs hold a special place in everyday communication. They are vessels of ancestral knowledge and social guidance. 

In this article, we delve into the world of Ijaw proverbs, exploring their significance, themes, and cultural context.

Introduction to the Ijaw people

The Ijaw people, also known as the Izon, are one of the largest ethnic groups in Nigeria, primarily inhabiting the coastal regions of the Niger Delta. 

With a rich history steeped in fishing, farming, and trade, the Ijaw have preserved their cultural heritage through language, rituals, and oral traditions. Central to these traditions are proverbs, which play a vital role in communication, education, and social cohesion.

The significance of Ijaw proverbs in Ijaw culture

In Ijaw society, proverbs serve multifaceted purposes, ranging from communication to entertainment, moral instruction, and conflict resolution. They are passed down from generation to generation, ensuring the preservation of cultural identity and knowledge.

Ijaw proverbs are often used in everyday conversations, ceremonies, storytelling, and traditional songs, enriching the fabric of community life.

Themes in Ijaw proverbs

Ijaw proverbs cover a wide range of themes that reflect the values, experiences, and worldviews of the people. Some common themes include:

Wisdom and knowledge

Many Ijaw proverbs impart timeless wisdom and insights into human behaviour, relationships, and societal norms. For example, “A bird does not fly so high that the hunter cannot shoot it” underscores the importance of humility and caution in the face of danger.

Community and unity

Proverbs emphasising the strength of unity and cooperation are prevalent in Ijaw culture. “When brothers fight to the death, a stranger inherits their father’s property” highlights the destructive consequences of internal conflict and the need for harmony within families and communities.

Nature and environment

As a people deeply connected to their natural surroundings, Ijaw proverbs often draw inspiration from the environment. “A tree does not make a forest” emphasises the collective effort needed to achieve significant goals. This mirrors the interconnectedness of ecosystems and human society.

Resilience and adaptability

Given their history of overcoming adversity and environmental challenges, Ijaw proverbs celebrate resilience and adaptability. “When a tree falls, the birds scatter” acknowledges the inevitability of change and the need to adapt to new circumstances.

Ijaw Proverbs: A Window Into Tradition, Wisdom, Culture | Fab.ng

5 Ijaw proverbs and their meanings

1. “Mèn wàrà fín, fín ébè pèrè.”

“When the water recedes, the fish trap is exposed.”

This proverb illustrates the idea that hidden truths or secrets are revealed when difficult times pass. Just as the receding water exposes the fish trap, challenges or obstacles can reveal hidden aspects of a situation or individual.

2. “Á dí èèrè, mèn fí di àrè.”

 “One who sows in haste will reap in hunger.”

This proverb emphasises the importance of patience, diligence, and careful planning in achieving long-term success. Rushing through tasks or decisions without proper consideration can lead to negative consequences and unfulfilled desires.

3. “Ì kè gbòpèrè àghòpè ì ní dí bòròbòrò.”

“The river that forgets its source will dry up.”

This proverb highlights the significance of remembering and honouring one’s origins, heritage, and ancestral wisdom. Just as a river depends on its source for sustenance, individuals who disregard their roots risk losing their identity and connection to their community.

4. “Ì wàrà è rípè, è sí è lè rípè è ní gbónù gbónù.”

“The palm wine tapper climbs high, but when he falls, he falls heavily.”

This proverb warns against arrogance, overconfidence, and the dangers of pride. It suggests that those who attain success or ascend to high positions should remain humble and mindful of the potential consequences of their actions, as a fall from a great height can be especially painful.

5. “À tòrò tènè, mèn kè bò, mèn gbá tènè.”

“The rope of a canoe never breaks when it is in the hands of those who know how to paddle.”

This proverb underscores the importance of competence, skill, and experience in achieving success and overcoming challenges. It implies that individuals who possess the necessary knowledge and expertise are better equipped to navigate life’s obstacles and steer towards their goals effectively.

Preservation and revitalization efforts

While Ijaw proverbs continue to thrive in oral tradition, modernization and globalisation pose challenges to their preservation. Efforts are underway to document and archive these proverbs, ensuring their accessibility to future generations. 

Additionally, cultural festivals, educational programmes, and community initiatives play a crucial role in revitalising the use of proverbs and promoting cultural pride among the youth.

In conclusion…

Ijaw proverbs are not merely linguistic expressions but repositories of culture, wisdom, and identity. They reflect the resilience, values, and collective wisdom of a people deeply rooted in tradition yet adaptable to change. 

By cherishing and preserving their proverbs, the Ijaw community sustains a vital link to its past while navigating the complexities of the modern world. As guardians of this rich oral tradition, the Ijaw people continue to inspire generations with the timeless wisdom encapsulated in their proverbs.

Check out more here.

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ARTS & CULTURE

Wole Soyinka’s “The Man Died” Film Adaptation Set For Release In Nigeria & UK In July

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"The Man Died" Film Adaptation Set For Release In July | Fab.ng

There’s a new movie coming out in July to celebrate the 90th birthday of famous Nigerian writer Wole Soyinka. The movie is called “The Man Died.” It’s based on Soyinka’s book about his experiences as a political prisoner during the Nigerian Civil War in the late 1960s.

The movie stars Nollywood actor Wale Ojo as Wole Soyinka. Awam Amkpa directed the film and announced the July release date on Instagram on May 2.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Awam Amkpa (@amkpa)

Wole Soyinka wrote the book, which is a memoir, in 1972, just two years after the war ended.

He’s a very important figure in African literature. He won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1986, making him the first Sub-Saharan African to receive the award. Last year, on Soyinka’s 89th birthday, Wale Ojo called him a “rare icon.”

“Akinwande Oluwole Babatunde Soyinka is 89 years old today. Love him OR hate him HE has earned his place amongst the G. O. A. T. of this universe!” the 55-year-old posted on Instagram.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by wale ojo (@realwaleojo)

The film adaptation of “The Man Died” boasts a stellar cast of Nollywood luminaries. They include actors like Chidi Mokeme, Sam Dede, Norbert Young, Francis Onwochei, Edmond Enabe, and Segilola Ogidan.

Additionally, the ensemble features rising talents. They include Simileoluwa Hassan, Christiana Oshunniyi, and the newcomer Abraham Amkpa, each of whom brings their unique flair to the project. Filmmaker Femi Odugbemi spearheaded the production, while writer Bode Asiyanbi penned the screenplay.

Scheduled for release in July, the film’s premiere will coincide with the 90th birthday celebration of the esteemed Nobel laureate Wole Soyinka, whose literary legacy is the inspiration for the cinematic adaptation. This timely release promises to honour Soyinka’s seminal work and celebrate his enduring influence on literature and culture.

“The Man Died” is poised to follow in the footsteps of Soyinka’s other notable works that have been adapted for the screen. This includes “Death and the King’s Horseman,” which was recently brought to life in the Netflix film “Elesin Oba, The King’s Horseman.”

Furthermore, the stellar cast includes Odunlade Adekola, Shaffy Bello, Deyemi Okanlawon, Omowunmi Dada, and Jide Kosoko. The adaptation garnered widespread acclaim for its faithful interpretation of Soyinka’s powerful narrative.

Beyond the cinema, Soyinka’s literary works continue to captivate audiences worldwide. Timeless classics such as “The Lion and the Jewel,” “The Trials of Brother Jero,” “Aké: The Years of Childhood,” and “You Must Set Forth at Dawn.” Each of these works showcases Soyinka’s unparalleled talent for weaving tales that explore themes of identity, tradition, and societal transformation.

Check out more movie updates here.

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ARTS & CULTURE

5 Countries That Still Practice Female Genital Mutilation

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Female Genital Mutilation: Countries That Still Practice It | Fab.ng

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) is a harmful traditional practice carried out in over 30 African countries, as well as some countries in Asia and the Middle East. Sadly, it’s often seen as a necessary part of raising a girl and preparing her for adulthood and marriage. The misconception is that FGM prevents promiscuity and ensures “virginity.”

Let’s look at some of the countries where FGM is prevalent:

1. Indonesia

Here, over 90% of Muslim women have undergone FGM, impacting a staggering 70 million women and girls. This number represents a disturbing 35% of the global burden of FGM. Despite the practice’s prevalence, no laws explicitly ban it in Indonesia or other Asian countries.

2. Saudi Arabia

Although FGM is considered illegal worldwide, Saudi Arabia lacks clear legislation against it. FGM is still practised in some areas, like Jeddah and Hali. A concerning statistic reveals that 18.2% of women in Saudi Arabia—nearly one in five—have undergone FGM/C.

3. Yemen

A study in Yemeni coastal areas found an alarming prevalence of FGM—89% among women and nearly 80% among young girls in surveyed families. Shockingly, two-thirds of women and half of men in these areas have little understanding of the harmful effects of FGM.

4. Somalia

With the highest number of FGM cases globally, Somalia paints a grim picture. A staggering 98% of girls between 5 and 11 years old have undergone Type III infibulation. This is the most severe form of FGM. UNICEF estimates that at least 200 million girls across 31 countries have been subjected to FGM. It highlights the devastating global impact of this practice.

Unfortunately, Egypt leads the world in the number of women and girls who have gone through female genital mutilation or cutting (FGM/C). This practice, widely considered harmful, has impacted a staggering 87.2% of women in Egypt between the ages of 15 and 49.

This alarming statistic becomes even more impactful when considering Egypt’s large population of nearly 95 million people. The sheer number of women affected underscores the urgency of addressing this deeply concerning traditional practice.

Even though FGM is outlawed in some of these countries, the practice continues. In many others, there are either no laws against it or the laws are weak and not enforced. Here’s a list of African countries where FGM is still practised:

  • Benin
  • Burkina Faso
  • Cameroon
  • Central African Republic
  • Chad, Cote d’Ivoire
  • Djibouti, Eritrea
  • Ethiopia
  • Gambia
  • Ghana
  • Guinea
  • Guinea-Bissau
  • Kenya
  • Liberia
  • Mali
  • Mauritania
  • Niger
  • Nigeria
  • Senegal
  • Sierra Leone
  • Somalia
  • Sudan
  • Tanzania
  • Togo
  • Uganda

FGM is a horrific practice with no health benefits for girls or women. It can cause a range of serious medical problems. These include:

  • Severe bleeding
  • Difficulty urinating
  • Cysts
  • Infections
  • Complications during childbirth
  • An increased risk of death for newborns.

Also, this is why so many organisations are working hard to raise awareness about the dangers of FGM and end this harmful tradition for good.

Read more articles here.

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